Combustion Air Ducts, Part I: Why Houses Need Them

Combustion Air Ducts, Part I: Why Houses Need Them

By In Combustion Air Ducts On March 19, 2013


Have you ever noticed a big insulated tube dropping down next to the floor near your furnace or boiler in the basement?

Makeup Air Duct

If you trace this duct down, you’ll find that it connects to an opening at the exterior of the building.  This is essentially just a hole in the side of the building that brings in fresh outdoor air.  Homeowners, builders, and insulation contractors spend lots of  time trying to seal up every little air leak in to a house, but then the building code requires this big hole that allows cold air to just dump in to the basement.  Silly, right?

I’ll try to help make some sense of this.

Houses need air

This opening is a passive intake that provides needed air to the home.  There are several items in a home that remove air – here’s a partial list of common items found in Minnesota homes that remove air from the house:

  • Furnaces and boilers that are not direct vent / sealed combustion type
  • Water heaters that are not direct vent / sealed combustion type (at least 99%)
  • Bathroom exhaust fans
  • Kitchen exhaust fans
  • Clothes dryers
  • Wood burning fireplaces

The stack effect in a home, wind, and radon mitigation fans may also remove air.  The most common and obvious problem with too much air being removed from a house is a backdrafting water heater, but there’s a lot more to it than just this.

Houses leak

When air is removed from a house, it has to be replaced.  If a house is not built tight, the air will get replaced from every little hole in the envelope in the house; the photos below show a few examples.  These are the things that get corrected to make houses “tighter”.   The first photo below shows an outlet box at an exterior wall that hadn’t yet been sealed.  Those openings get sealed in new houses today, but this never used to happen.

Leaky Outlet

The photo below shows the furnace vents going through the rim joist.  Daylight is visible around these penetrations, which means air leakage.

Leaks in rim joist

The opening around the faucet is obvious.

Air leak at sillcock

Of course, windows and doors are also a huge source of air leakage.  Daylight showing through is a dead giveaway.

Daylight visible below door

Leaking door with IR overlay

Unsealed openings in the exterior walls equates to uncontrolled air leakage.  Every time the wind blows, air will leak in or out through these openings.  Even without any air moving at the exterior, the stack effect in a home will cause air to leak in through the lower openings in the envelope of a home, and back out through the upper openings, such as attic bypasses.  The image below, used with permission © 2013 E Source, gives a visual example of the stack effect.

Stack Effect

The line of neutral pressure plane will be different in every home.  Some of the factors that affect this are differences in indoor / outdoor temperatures, wind, the height of the home, and how much air is leaking.  For the upper ‘positive pressure’ leaks, one of the most obvious that can be viewed from inside the house is a loose-fitting attic access panel.

Leak at attic access panel

Other attic air leaks, most of which can only be seen from inside the attic, are also major contributors.  These include leaks around furnace vents, electrical cables, plumbing vents, chimneys, etc.

When air is allowed to leak through the house uncontrolled like this, the amount of air leakage and energy loss is typically much more than it needs to be, and it doesn’t happen where, when, or how it should.  This can lead to condensation and frost at windows, in the attic, and even inside the walls.

Frost at basement wall

 

The Combustion Air Duct

To help reduce the effects of uncontrolled air leakage, houses get sealed up as tight as possible and a single hole is created to bring outdoor air in to the basement, usually right next to the furnace.  This is the combustion air duct I showed at the beginning of this post.

When a combustion air duct is properly installed, it will help prevent the house from getting depressurized.  The air is allowed to come in to the house as needed through a large opening, and all of those other holes in the walls can be sealed up.  To see how well this works in a new house, try running all of the exhaust fans for about 5 minutes, then put your hand over the end of the combustion air duct; if it’s working properly, you’ll feel plenty of air pumping in to the house.  Beautiful.

I’ll have a follow-up post next week discussing the most common installation and maintenance problems with combustion air ducts, and well as the solutions.  Of course, I’ll have photos of everything.

Related Posts:

Special thanks to Steve Schirber at Cocoon Insulation for helping to write this post.

Author: Reuben Saltzman, Structure Tech Home Inspections

          


About the Author

Reuben

Reuben is a second generation home inspector with a passion for his work. He grew up remodeling homes and learning about carpentry since he was old enough to hold a hammer. Reuben has worked for Structure Tech since it was purchased by Neil in 1997, and is now co-owner of the company. Reuben’s favorite customers are the ones who have a lot of questions; he grew up thinking he was going to be a school teacher because he enjoyed teaching others so much. In a sense, that’s a lot of what home inspections are about, so Reuben truly does what he loves. Reuben has an A.A. degree in liberal arts and has attended most of the Building Inspection Technology classes at North Hennepin Community College. Reuben and his wife are the proud parents of two young childen, Cy Alexander and Lucy Nicole, and have a German Shepherd named Stanley. With two young children Reuben doesn’t have much free time, but he still tries to play disc golf as often as possible during the summer. Reuben lives in Maple Grove, MN. Professional Qualifications / Memberships: *ASHI Certified Inspector *President, ASHI Heartland Chapter *Member, Minnesota Society of Housing Inspectors (MSHI) *Licensed Minneapolis Truth-in-Sale of Housing Evaluator *Licensed Saint Paul Truth-in-Sale of Housing Evaluator *Licensed Maplewood Truth-in-Sale of Housing Evaluator *Licensed Hopkins Truth-in-Housing Evaluator *Licensed Robbinsdale Point of Sale Evaluator *Affiliate Member, Southern Twin Cities Association of Realtors

Related Posts

9 Comments

  • Reuben Saltzman 1 YEAR AGO

    @Lea - http://www.structuretech1.com/2013/03/combustion-air-ducts-part-ii-problems-and-solutions/

  • Lea Smith 1 YEAR AGO

    I just had an energy audit and my gas hot water heater was red tagged for back drafting. I just read your Part 1 combustion air duct. Have you written Part 2? If so where can I find it. I've been unemployed for 2 years with health issues so money is tight. I really want to address this problem but I'm looking for advise before I start anything. I'm also getting ready to start testing my basement for radon because it is prevalent in our area. I realize remediation will just make my existing condition worse. I really appreciate your article Part 1 but I'm past this point and looking for part 2. Thank you, Lea Ann

  • Aaron 2 YEARS AGO

    Great, thanks so much for the suggestion.

  • Aaron 2 YEARS AGO

    I think I'm famous! Or at least, one my exterior faucets is. These come from real-life inspections you do, right? Any suggestions about what can I should do about that gap? Is perhaps spray-foam filler an appropriate choice?

  • Eric Aune 2 YEARS AGO

    Great job Reuben, as always!

    • Reuben Saltzman 2 YEARS AGO

      Eric - thanks! Aaron - yes, all of those photos were taken from inspections that I did. When exposed to sunlight, expanding foam will break down. Exterior caulk would work fine to seal around that sillcock.